Search

Categories

Eduboard.com Blog

Top Ten Theories That Science Created and Debunked

Hire a tutor
Choose Deadline:

Coundown will start only after the payment

 

People trust scientists. We tend to believe every single word they say. We refer to them whenever we need to raise the profile of our words or ideas. We cite them to look smarter and better educated. But we sometimes forget that they are just people and thus are not immune to making mistakes or sticking to the wrong concepts. Throughout the history people have been trying to get answers to all their questions. They experimented, invented, theorized and speculated.

Below is the list of top ten most interesting but now-debunked theories that once were welcomed by reputable academics and accepted by the whole scientific community.

1. Alchemy is one of the main and most exciting occult sciences to have ever existed. It originated in Ancient Egypt and soon merged with metallurgy in its early form. Trying to find ways to turn metal into gold, men discovered the formulas for making glass, mortar and porcelain among other things. Although it has been proven to be majorly false, alchemy turned out to be more useful than it is given credit for nowadays.

2. Ancient Greeks and ancient Chinese believed that the Earth was the center of the Universe and all objects rotated around it. The misconception evolved into the theory called geocentricity that appeared to be very realistic due to the fact that the Sun and the Moon visibly turned round the Earth, which in its turn seemed static. Through the efforts of Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler this theory was finally debunked in the 16th century.

3. Spontaneous generation is another bizarre theory that reigned unchallenged for thousands of years. Having no ways to prove it wrong, people believed that life could have arisen out of nothing. Aristotle among other wise men was the vocal advocate for this belief. The credibility of the spontaneous generation theory was first tested when the scientific method was introduced. The invention of the microscope helped to dispel the myth once and for all.

4. Phlogiston theory was proposed by Johan Joachim Becher in 1667. The theory suggested that all objects capable of catching fire (e.g. trees, paper) contained a special element called phlogiston that made the whole process of burning possible. It was believed to have no color, odor or taste and could become visible only when combustible objects were burning. Becher, who based his theory partly on the fact that phlogiston-containing objects lost in weight after burning, was proven wrong by later experiments with elements like magnesium that became heavier through burning instead losing weight. The theory was finally replaced by a more complex concept of oxidation.

5. Tabula rasa is a theory, first expressed by Aristotle, who proclaimed that people were born with no in-built disposition or traits. They were believed to form their personality through life experience, education and perception. The theory remained pretty much unchallenged until genes were discovered and proved to play an important part in shaping a person’s character.

6. The classical elemental theory offered by inventive, if not always rigorous, Greeks stated that all substance was made of four elements which are earth, water, air and fire. It was disproved with the development of scientific knowledge about chemical elements, atoms and particles.

7. Phrenology was once believed to be a well-studied branch of neuroscience. Its proponents assumed that human’s brain could be divided into several sections (thirty-five, to be exact) that controlled certain character traits such as aggression, humor, egoism etc. the were sure that the bigger a particular brain section was, the more predisposed a person was to certain traits. Thus, phrenology practitioners would measure a person’s skull trying to find out what personality he had. This pseudoscience was dismissed at the beginning of the 20th century when scientific progress proved the irrelevance of such theory. However, phrenology survived and was applied in the 20th to promote racism by the Nazis.

8. Before the germ theory was fully developed people believed all contagious diseases were transmitted through air only. They denied to acknowledge there could be other sources such as water or ground, which cost millions of people their life. The misconception came to be known as miasmatic theory of disease.

9. From all scientific theories, those, based on the lack of medical knowledge, were the most dreadful ones. Thus, it was long believed that blood-letting was the cure for all diseases. Doctors drained people nearly dry of blood trying to help them overcome their illnesses.

10. Scientists of the 19th century mistakenly believed the Earth was about 20 to 40 million years old. Later on geologists together with biologists were able to debunk the theory proving the Earth to be at least 4.55 billion years old.

Although all of these theories and beliefs are scientifically incorrect, it is worth saying that many of them resulted into more reliable and accurate knowledge.

People trust scientists. We tend to believe every single word they say. We refer to them whenever we need to raise the profile of our words or ideas. We cite them to look smarter and better educated. But we sometimes forget that they are just people and thus are not immune to making mistakes or sticking to the wrong concepts. Throughout the history people have been trying to get answers to all their questions. They experimented, invented, theorized and speculated.

 

Related Posts:

Most Popular Services

Follow us

on social networks